Return of Arizona’s monsoon season

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thurs., July 13, 2017

CONTACT:
Jim Knupp, Public Information Officer
602.771.6710

AZ ROC Increases Efforts to Warn
Damaged Property Owners
Against Hiring Unlicensed Entities

PHOENIX, Ariz., (July 13, 2017) – With the return of Arizona’s monsoon season and wildfires, the Arizona Registrar of Contractors (AZ ROC) warns homeowners against property repair scams and continues to increase efforts to curb unlicensed activity in impacted areas.

In just the past week, AZ ROC investigators have been to Gold Canyon (monsoon), Dudleyville (fire) and Pine Flats (fire) and the Agency wants property owners to be aware of ‘storm chasers.’

‘Storm chasers’ are typically unlicensed individuals attempting to take advantage of homeowners who may want to hire someone quickly to make repairs to their damaged property. These unlicensed entities often may promise cheap or discounted repairs made with “left over” materials.

Ranging from poor work to complete abandonment, the AZ ROC commonly receives complaints against these unlicensed entities taking advantage of property owners.  These unlicensed individuals only add to the devastation for those affected by a natural disaster.

In what is an ongoing effort which began in 2015, AZ ROC investigators continue to patrol and post warning signs throughout areas impacted by wildfire or monsoon damage to remind property owners to hire only licensed contractors in order to protect themselves against the potential of a second disaster.

AZ ROC works closely with the Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management to know when structures are threatened by wildfires.  As a result, AZ ROC investigators stand ready to ensure homeowners impacted by wildfires are educated about both the benefits of hiring licensed professionals and the potential of falling victim to a second disaster by hiring unlicensed ‘storm chasers.’

Aside from wildfires, the monsoon season poses yet another threat to property owners. The monsoon season officially started on June 15th and will end on September 30th. High winds and rushing waters, often associated with monsoon season, create the potential for property damages such as uprooted trees, roof damage, and flooding. Several neighborhoods throughout the valley have already experienced injury to property that has or will require repair.

AZ ROC encourages all property owners to hire only licensed contracting professionals.  For more information or tips you should know before you hire, log on to roc.az.gov and also use the contractor search to find licensed contractors in your area.

Background:

Since the Arizona legislature created the Registrar of Contractors in 1931, it has served two core functions; licensing and the regulation of the licensing of contractors.  For licensing, AZ ROC ensures contractors possess the experience, training and knowledge required in order to qualify for a license and then issues the appropriate credentials.  When considering regulation, the agency works to curb unlicensed entities working within Arizona and investigates complaints made against licensed contractors regarding professional standards of their work.

Being an insurance agency’s ‘Preferred Vendor’

Protection arrangement holder’s be careful: The property protection industry needs to roll out improvements

Before, property rebuilding entrepreneurs were represented the deciding factor by what is alluded to as a ‘favored seller list’ made by extensive property insurance agencies (i.e. Across the nation, Allstate, State ranch, and so forth.). By turning into a ‘Preferred Vendor’, national establishment reclamation organizations like Servpro and ServiceMaster can depict proceeded with worth to their franchisees. Being an insurance agency’s ‘favored seller’ implies an extensive amount of rebuilding work for the merchant, however what does it mean for the approach holder?

In the first place, we have to analyze a run of the mill water harm or surge harm rebuilding claim circumstance. Previously, a mortgage holder/approach holder would call their protection claim line or specialist in the event that they found a water harm crisis. Now they would ordinarily be alluded to a ‘favored seller’ to do the crisis water extraction and drying out of the property. The term ‘favored seller’ is proposed to make the property proprietor trust, and in this way utilize, said merchant for the reclamation work. It is likewise deliberately left misty that the mortgage holder can enlist whomever they might want to play out the work in their home.

Property rebuilding organizations work for the mortgage holder and not for the insurance agencies. All protection property rebuilding is held to an industry standard set by the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) or Clean Trust and all related work is relied upon to be done in agreement to the norms put forward. All protection rebuilding is additionally held to institutionalized evaluating. This is to guarantee that tenable business are all held to the same quality standard of work and charge the property holders the same sum for the same administrations.

To end up a ‘Preferred Vendor’ with one of the extensive insurance agencies, you need to consent to work off a marked down value rundown or consent to set a breaking point to drying time consequently for a vast volume of work. This gets to be engaging rebuilding entrepreneurs who no more need to spend as much promoting themselves. By giving up some of their edge for a higher amount of work, they are presently ready to profit.

This is the place the inquiries of morals emerge: If any rebuilding entrepreneur, is getting most, if not all, of your leads from favored merchant list calls do you REALLY work for the mortgage holder? On the other hand do you twist to the impulse of the insurance agency to abstain from betraying the one who provides everything for them? In the event that a reclamation entrepreneur is ensuring not to charge the insurance agency after a set measure of time for drying the structure, what do you do when they achieve that farthest point and the structure is still wet? Do they keep on working, basically for nothing? Then again do you leave the property wet and proceed onward to the following occupation? How are they truly helping the approach holder cut future expenses? One such circumstance simply made the news as of late and is getting national consideration:

Concerns Of Hiring a “Preferred Contractor”

  • many preferred contractors can be reluctant to oppose the opinion of an insurance adjuster and stand with the homeowner when it comes to an issue of an item that needs to be replaced instead of being cleaned, patched, or repaired.  In these situations, a preferred contractor may fear loss of favor with an insurance company and  may not be bold enough to take a stand for what needs to be done regardless of the adjusters opinion on the matter.  Or they may agree with the adjuster up front until they get the job, but while performing the work, only to change their mind.
  • If the preferred contractor is not found on a formal approved vendor program but simply an acquaintance of the adjuster, you may not get any true benefit over using another contractor of equal or superior qualifications.  The danger here is that there can be a false sense of security created to the homeowner by the preferred contractor simply because they were invited by the adjuster.
  • In most cases, adjusters are required to write their own estimates.   most insurance adjusters are not licensed contractors and do not have the knowledge nor hands on building experience  for repairing damaged property. If the insurance adjuster brings a preferred contractor with them, they may try to reach an agreed cost using that contractor as their “expert” in order to speed up the claim.  While some adjusters may try to be as thorough and accurate as possible, you should always get a second opinion to scope the cost of the repairs.  If the insurance adjuster underestimates the costs of work, you may not be able to get the repairs done or if they are done, they may not be to the quality you would expect. If the estimator for the preferred contractor is inexperienced with the work that needs to be done, you could be stuck in a situation where the blind are leading the blind.
  • Just because a contractor may be on the preferred vendor program, you still run the same risks using them as any other non-preferred vendor.  This includes the risks of going bankrupt, shoddy work, construction defects, not showing up, failing to pay sub-contractors and a host of other terrible issues.  Ultimately it’s your choice on who you will have work on and in your home and if you decide to use a preferred contractor to do the work and they fail to perform as expected you will have no recourse with the adjuster or the insurance company that recommended them to you.

ASAP is not a preferred vendor!

How to Best Survive a Monsoon in Arizona

Monsoon Season

Summer is here and for the next three months the monsoon will rule the Arizona weather. Featuring dazzling displays of lightning, powerful winds that will rip off roofs and uproot trees, and pounding rain that will flood washes and sweep away cars and homes.

What is the monsoon?

According to the National Weather Service, the word “monsoon” is derived from the Arabic word “mausim,” which means season. So, as opposed to an individual storm, the monsoon is a specific season of the year.

In Arizona, the monsoon is essentially a change in the weather patterns and wind direction. As the wind flow shifts from the west and southwest the rain follows.  As winds change to flow in from the east and southeast they bring wiht them a hefty level of moisture from the Gulf of Mexico and California. As Arizona braces for the monsoon season the temperature and wind shifts herald the arrival of the stormy season.

Will this monsoon be any different?

With the early heat wave Arizona has this year, the heat may have any impact on how the monsoon season will proceed.

What are the records?

According to National Weather Service records that go back to 1896, the wettest monsoon was in 1984, when a total of 9.56 inches of rain fell. But the latest season to make the “Top 10 Wettest” list was in 2014, which came in seventh at 6.34 inches.

The driest monsoon on record was in 1924 — only 0.35 inches of rain fell. The most recent season on the “Top 10 Driest” list was in 2007, the fifth-driest on record with 0.74 inches.

According to the Weather Service, La Niña is a term for the cooling of tropical waters from south of Hawaii to about the coast of South America. El Niño is the opposite, bringing warmer temperatures to that region.

How can you prepare?

We can’t do anything to prevent the monsoon, but we can be prepared. Deputy Chief Forrest Smith of the Mesa Fire and Medical Department said sandbags are the best way to divert water from doorways and help to protect your home from flooding during a monsoon storm.

Free sandbags are available for pickup at many fire stations throughout the Valley. Some provide bags and shovels for use, but others require residents to bring their own shovels and bags. You can call your local fire department or check their website to see what you will need to bring to get sandbags for your home.

Visit mesaaz.gov and search for “sandbags” to find tips on how to use sandbags to protect your home from flooding.

Read more: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-weather/2016/06/12/monsoon-time-arizona-2016/85573530/

Monsoon Safety Tips

The Mesa Fire and Medical Department offers the following safety tips to help Valley residents prepare for the various weather events that make up the monsoon:

Thunderstorms and lightning: If you can hear thunder, then you are close enough to be struck by lightning.
Take shelter in a sturdy building or a hard-topped vehicle. You should remain in this shelter 30 minutes after hearing the last rumble of thunder.

Telephone lines conduct electricity, so avoid using landline phones during a storm.
Metal pipes also conduct electricity, so avoid taking showers and baths or using running water during a storm.
Bring pets indoors.

High Winds: Arizona thunderstorm winds often exceed 40 mph and straight-line winds can exceed 100 mph.
Move into a central interior room away from windows to avoid blowing debris that could shatter glass.
If you are driving in high winds, slow down and anticipate steering correction when moving from protected to unprotected wind areas or when encountering large passing vehicles.

Be aware of high-profile vehicles — trucks, semis, buses, campers, or those towing a trailer — because they can be unpredictable during high winds.

Before the monsoon storm hits, evaluate large trees close to your home for potential hazards.

Dust storms: If you are caught in a dust storm while driving, pull off the roadway as far as safely possible. Turn off headlights and taillights, put the vehicle in park, and take your foot off the brake.

With reduced visibility, other drivers behind you could see the brake lights and assume you are driving on the road and follow your lights.

When severe dust storms occur, consider cleaning your smoke detectors. Dust can clog detectors and cause false alarms.

Floods: Monsoon lighting over the Valley with Piestewa Peak in the distance. This is 45 minutes of video condensed into 58 seconds. Video by Rob Schumacher

Monsoon: Whether we like it or not, it’s almost here. For the next three months, we’ll be treated to dazzling displays of lightning, powerful winds that will rip off roofs and uproot trees, and pounding rain that will flood washes and sweep away cars.

 

What is the monsoon?

According to the National Weather Service, the word “monsoon” is derived from the Arabic word “mausim,” which means season. So, as opposed to an individual storm, the monsoon is a specific season of the year.

Here in Arizona, the monsoon is essentially a change in the weather pattern. We have winds that typically blow in from the west and southwest, keeping the state fairly dry. Around this time of year, however, the wind flow shifts.

It starts to blow in from the east and southeast, dragging an unusual amount of moisture from the Gulf of Mexico into Arizona on its way up to the Four Corners.

When Arizona’s heat and overall unstable weather mixes with the moisture brought in by these winds, storms arise.

Will this monsoon be any different?

With the early heat wave Arizona has experienced this year, many may be wondering if the heat will have any impact on how the monsoon will play out.

Carl Cerniglia, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Tucson, shed some light on the subject, saying that, while we can expect a warmer summer than usual, the heat should not affect the monsoon much.

“If anything, there’s a slight chance (the monsoon) could be slower as an aftereffect of El Niño,” Cerniglia said.

What are the records?

 

According to National Weather Service records that go back to 1896, the wettest monsoon was in 1984, when a total of 9.56 inches of rain fell. But the latest season to make the “Top 10 Wettest” list was in 2014, which came in seventh at 6.34 inches.

The driest monsoon on record was in 1924 — only 0.35 inches of rain fell. The most recent season on the “Top 10 Driest” list was in 2007, the fifth-driest on record with 0.74 inches.

While Cerniglia said we can expect some rain on Thursday and Friday, he said it should be dry for the rest of the month.

“June is typically a pretty dry month, but a lot of times when we’re in La Niña situations, we can have a hefty monsoon season,” he said. “This year, we have El Niño disappearing and La Niña starting to form in the fall, so there’s no strong influence one way or another. It should be a pretty typical monsoon season.”

According to the Weather Service, La Niña is a term for the cooling of tropical waters from south of Hawaii to about the coast of South America. El Niño is the opposite, bringing warmer temperatures to that region.

The Weather Service said the terms originated in Peru when Peruvian fishermen noticed that the waters were really warm right around Christmas. They called it El Niño, which means “the Christ Child,” or “the Little Boy,” and the opposing weather phenomenon took on the name La Niña, meaning “the Little Girl.”

El Niño typically brings more rain and moisture in the winter months, while La Niña typically provides drier weather.

How have people been affected in the past?

Mesa mother and daughter recall the flood of Sept. 8, 2014. David Wallace/The Republic

 

How can you prepare?

We can’t do anything to prevent the monsoon, but we can be prepared.

Free sandbags are available for pickup at many fire stations throughout the Valley. Some provide bags and shovels for use, but others require residents to bring their own shovels and bags. You can call your local fire department or check their website to see what you will need to bring to get sandbags for your home.

The Mesa Fire and Medical Department offers the following safety tips to help Valley residents prepare for the various weather events that make up the monsoon:

According to the National Weather Service, nearly half of all flood fatalities are vehicle related. Never drive into a flooded roadway: It is extremely difficult to estimate the depth of running water or the strength of a current.
Never drive around barricades. They are there for a reason, usually because flooding is anticipated or has already happened. In addition, the road could be damaged and unsafe for drivers.
It only takes 1 to 2 feet of water to float most vehicles, including SUVs.
Never allow children to play near washes or storm drains after any rainfall. They can be swept away.
Downed power lines

Across a roadway:
Consider any downed power line to be energized and dangerous. Never touch a downed power line or anything close to it. High voltage can travel through the ground. Stay at least 100 feet away from any downed lines.
Across a vehicle:
If the vehicle is occupied, stay in the vehicle until professional help arrives. Avoid contact with metal surfaces both inside and outside the vehicle. If there is a fire in the vehicle, jump from the vehicle landing on both feet. Hop away, keeping both feet in contact with each other until you are at least 100 feet from the vehicle.

Phoenix Monsoon Season

Arizona residents endure a heavy monsoon (summer thunderstorm) season. Arizona experiences more severe storms and rainy weather than other states. When a severe storm spawn a microburst the rainfall levels can be exponential. High winds, dust and severe downpours result in flash flooding that can damage homes and businesses during the monsoon season.

Beginning in 2008, June 15 is established as the first day of monsoon, and September 30 will be the last day – but storms can start sooner and end later. Monsoon safety is a pivotal concern – as temperatures rise and the Gulf fuels the storm clouds, residents in Phoenix and Scottsdale can experience torrential rains and monsoon conditions.

Here are monsoon facts for Arizona. These facts relate to dew point and the meteorological definition of monsoon:

  • The average starting date of the monsoon in Phoenix is July 7.
  • The average ending date of the monsoon is September 13.
  • The earliest start date for the monsoon was June 16, 1925.
  • The latest start date for the monsoon was July 25, 1987.
  • The average date of the first break in the monsoon is August 16.
  • The average total number of monsoon days (where a monsoon day is considered one with an average dew point of 55 degrees or higher) is 56.
  • The greatest number of monsoon days was 99, recorded in 1984.
  • The fewest number of monsoon days was 27, recorded in 1962.
  • The greatest number of consecutive monsoon days was 72, from June 25 through September 4, 1984. This was also the greatest number of consecutive days with dew points of 60 degrees or higher.
  • In Phoenix, normal rainfall during July, August and September is 2.65 inches.
  • The wettest monsoon occurred in 1984 when we had 9.38 inches of rain.
  • The driest monsoon occurred in 1924 with only 0.35 inches.

The facts above were obtained from the National Weather Service, Phoenix Weather Forecast Office.

Monsoon Season Can Cause Storm Damage in Phoenix

The monsoon season is on the verge of arrival in Arizona by late June. Temperatures soar into the 100/s and humidity increases as the storms brew. Grasses dry out in the sun and shade is at a premium everywhere. Once the wind picks up and clouds start rolling in you know that the summer storm season is closing in. Arizona braces for the welcome first drops of rain and dreads the damaging storms that follow in the monsoon season.

Monsoon is the name of the large scale weather pattern that takes hold in summer months in Arizona and across many other regions. Monsoons are caused by warm air creating surface low pressure zones that in turn draw moist air from the oceans. Arizona’s westerly winds shift to a southeasterly wind pattern in the summer. This brings moisture from the Gulf of Mexico and California. The wind shift produces storms in a cycle of “bursts” (heavy rainfall) and “breaks” (reduced rainfall).

The North American monsoon season occurs over northwest Mexico, Arizona, New Mexico, and parts of Colorado and Utah. Southeastern Arizona usually experiences stronger winds and the most rainfall. The monsoon season begins on or about June 15 and ends on or about September 30th. The storms in Arizona peak in July and mid-August. Approximately half of the annual rainfall in Arizona occurs during the monsoon season.

In Arizona the level of rainfall can vary between short distances. Mountain areas tend to receive the most rainfall. Downpours are often short and steady rainfall is usually heavy. The heavy rains can cause flash floods and damage homes and businesses. In addition, if moving water picks up debris from fire damaged areas, the combined force of the roiling water and debris can cause mudslides that can wipe out homes, businesses, standing trees and roadways.

Protect your home with adequate insurance for flood and fire damage. When you have a loss, you want the best coverage and the best fire damage and monsoon damage restoration company on your side. Remember to get mold testing and removal scheduled after storm waters invade your home. Contact ASAP Restoration for all your water, fire and monsoon damage restoration work.

 

Monsoon Season Storms in Arizona

In Arizona, known as The Valley of the Sun, temperatures can regularly top 100′. The higher temps in Phoenix & Scottsdales are going to signal the onset of monsoon season storms. Heatwaves are a triggering mechanism that starts the thunderstorms that will turn into monsoons over the summer rainy seasonar.

While monsoon season raises the average humidity levels, the rain cool the region.  While the monsoon rains typically arrive after July first, the moisture drawing into the state now is indicative of the summer storm season looming on the horizon.

Hot temperatures cause the formation of low pressure ridges which draw moisture from the Gulf of California and the Pacific Ocean. This then can become a deluge during the Arizona monsoon season. Phoenix and Scottsdale have seen exceptionally high temperatures this spring including a high of 118 degrees (the fifth-hottest day ever recorded in Phoenix). The extreme weather will continue through the summer monsoon season and excessive heat warnings will be common.

During the high heat and monsoon rains you should to stay indoors and out of the weather. The hottest parts of the day can be draining, and be sure to drink plenty of water to stay hydrated.